Research

 

Advancing Research That Gives Patients Real Answers

Our award-winning research is nationally and internationally recognized. We critically evaluate treatment options from a patient perspective, independent of outside interests. We work continuously to gather quality national data on spine health, publish our findings in nationally recognized peer-reviewed journals, and present at national and international conferences.

Our research is used by patients and their physicians to inform treatment plans for serious spinal conditions and medical researchers seeking to develop innovative new therapies.

 

Artificial Disc Replacement

Artificial disc replacement (ADR) was developed as an alternative to fusion surgeries as a method to preserve some motion and reduce stress on adjacent discs. ADR surgery is minimally invasive, with the goal of simulating normal disc function while increasing mobility and alleviating pain. There are a variety of artificial discs currently on the market.

The Foundation is investigating those composed from a combination of materials including ceramic, titanium, polyurethane, and polyether ether ketone (PEEK). All of these available artificial discs have a ‘moveable’ core, which allows for flexion and rotation once implanted. The Foundation is collaborating with industry partners to help identify the benefits of artificial discs and track the recovery progress of patients using them. The Foundation is also studying patient outcomes from disc replacement/fusion hybrid surgeries in the cervical spine.

 

Augmented Reality

 

Robotic-Guided Surgery

Many of The Foundation’s spine health research partners are currently utilizing navigation and various robotic-guidance platforms for surgery planning and hardware implantation, demonstrating greater accuracy than traditional surgery or fluoroscopic-guided (x-ray) techniques. Robotic-guided surgery provides the ability to create an extremely detailed preoperative plan, enabling the surgeon to prepare for the entire procedure before ever making an incision.

Robotics allows for more precise screw implantation and fewer complications versus the traditional freehand method. The system also allows for less radiation exposure for both the patient and the surgical team as well as greater accuracy of hardware placement, ultimately reducing recovery times. The Foundation is currently gathering outcome data on patients who have undergone robotic-guided surgery and hopes to use the data to identify the optimal robotic-guided system for the individual patient.

Discogenic Pain

Discogenic pain refers to pain originating from a damaged vertebral disc. This is commonly due to degenerative disc disease, a naturally occurring process due to aging. Discogenic pain can normally be treated with non-surgical treatments; however, it is sometimes so severe that it requires surgery. The Foundation is currently gathering patient-driven data on fusion surgeries to treat discogenic pain, which may be a viable alternative to their current treatment plan.

Industry Collaborations

The Foundation collaborates with a number of different medical device and biologics industry partners to help push new and novel treatments as standard of care. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires large amounts of data in order to determine if a new device or treatment is safe and effective for human use.

The Foundation assists in obtaining both physician and patient data on devices and biologics that are set for review by the FDA. These large data sets are compiled for the industry partner by The Foundation’s staff, researchers, and collaborators, with hopes of obtaining FDA approval and eventual translation into humans.

 

Read more about The Research Institute or our SpineOnline initiative.

 

Publication History

Jazini E, Haines C, Schuler TC, Sohail O, Orosz L, Roy R, Carreon LY, Good CR.  Adoption of Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) Protocol for Adult Spinal Deformity (ASD) Surgery Decreases In-Hospital and 90-day Post-operative Opioid Consumption. 2020 North American Spine Society (NASS).

Jazini E, Haines C, Orosz L, Bharara N, Schuler TC, Sohail O, Roy R, Carreon LY, Good C, Johnson N. Adoption of Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) Protocol for Lumbar Fusion Decreases In-Hospital Post-operative Opioid Consumption. 2020 North American Spine Society (NASS).

Schroerlucke SR, Harris EN, Roy R.  Improvements in Screw Placement and Accuracy With Newer Generation Robotic-Assisted Minimally Invasive Instrumented Lumbar Fusions. 2020 North American Spine Society (NASS).

Jazini E, Haines C, Orosz L, Bharara N, Schuler TC, Sohail O, Roy R, Carreon LY, Good C. Adoption of Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) Protocol for Lumbar Fusion Decreases In-Hospital Post-operative Opioid Consumption. 2019 Lumbar Spine Research Society (LSRS).

Jazini E, Haines C, Schuler TC, Sohail O, Orosz L, Roy R, Carreon LY, Good CR.  Adoption of Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) Protocol for Adult Spinal Deformity (ASD) Surgery Decreases In-Hospital and 90-day Post-operative Opioid Consumption. 2020 Scoliosis Research Society (SRS).

Jazini E, Haines C, Schuler TC, Sohail O, Orosz L, Roy R, Carreon LY, Good CR.  Adoption of Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) Protocol for Adult Spinal Deformity (ASD) Surgery Decreases In-Hospital and 90-day Post-operative Opioid Consumption. 2019 International Meeting on Advanced Spine Techniques (IMAST).

Early Adoption of Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) Protocol Following Adult Spinal Deformity (ASD) Surgery is Not Associated with Decreased Total In-hospital Opioid Use.2020 American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS)

Human Bone Marrow Concentrate-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Treatment of Low Back Pain: Patient Reported Outcomes Through One Year.2020 International Society for Advancement of Spine Surgery (ISASS)

The Use of rhBMP-2 in Cervical Arthrodesis for Patients with Cervical Degenerative Disc Disease. 2020 International Society for Advancement of Spine Surgery (ISASS)

Gorini C, Haines CM, Good CR, Woodlief S, Padin B, Jazini E.  Early adoption of enhanced recovery after surgery protocol following ASD surgery is not associated with decreased in-hospital opioid use. 2019 North American Spine Society Meeting (NASS). Podium presentation

Haines CM, Good CR, Schuler TC, Bharara N, Nguyen TT, Gorini C. Use of Human Bone Marrow Concentrate-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Treatment of Low Back Pain: Patient Reported Outcomes Through One Year. 2019 The Orthobiologics Institute (TOBI). Poster presentation

Schroerlucke SR, Wang MY, Cannestra A, Good CR, Lim JY, Hsu VW, Zahrawi F, Villalobos HJ, Ramirez PM, Sweeney T . Complications and revision rates in robotic-guided vs. fluoro-guided minimally invasive lumbar fusion surgery – report from MIS ReFRESH prospective comparative study. 2017 North American Spine Society Meeting. Podium Presentation

Subach BR, Copay AG. The use of a dehydrated amnion/chorion membrane allograft in patients who subsequently undergo reexploration after posterior lumbar instrumentation. Adv Orthop. 2015;2015:501202. doi: 10.1155/2015/501202. Epub 2015 Jan 13.

Copay AG. Commentary: the proliferation of minimum clinically important differences. Spine J. 2012 Dec;12(12):1129-31. doi: 10.1016/j.spinee.2012.11.022

Copay AG, Martin MM, Subach BR, Carreon LY, Glassman SD, Schuler TC, Berven S. Assessment of spine surgery outcomes: inconsistency of change amongst outcome measurements. Spine J. 2010 Apr;10(4):291-6. doi: 10.1016/j.spinee.2009.12.027. Epub 2010 Feb 19

Subach BR, Copay AG, Martin MM, Schuler TC, Romero-Gutierrez M. An unusual occurrence of chondromyxoid fibroma with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst in the cervical spine. Spine J. 2010 Feb;10(2):e5-9. doi: 10.1016/j.spinee.2009.11.016.

Copay AG, Glassman SD, Subach BR, Berven S, Schuler TC, Carreon LY. Minimum clinically important difference in lumbar spine surgery patients: a choice of methods using the Oswestry Disability Index, Medical Outcomes Study questionnaire Short Form 36, and pain scales. Spine J. 2008 Nov-Dec;8(6):968-74. doi: 10.1016/j.spinee.2007.11.006. Epub 2008 Jan 16

Copay AG, Subach BR, Glassman SD, Polly DW Jr, Schuler TC. Understanding the minimum clinically important difference: a review of concepts and methods. Spine J. 2007 Sep-Oct;7(5):541-6. Epub 2007 Apr 2. Review.